ABOUT THE COLLECTIONS

Welcome to the Rangelands archives. The archives provide public access, in a "rolling window" agreement with the Society for Range Management, to Rangelands (1979-present) from v.1 up to three years from the present year.

The most recent issues of Rangelands are available with membership in the Society for Range Management (SRM). Membership in SRM is a means to access current information and dialogue on rangeland management.

Your institution may also have access to current issues through library or institutional subscriptions.

ISSN: 0190-0528

QUESTIONS?

Contact the University Libraries Journal Team with questions about these journals.

Recent Submissions

  • Foreword: Who Will Speak for the Land?

    Pluhar, J. (Society for Range Management, 2018-12)
  • Ecological Health of Grasslands and Sagebrush Steppe on the Northern Yellowstone Range

    Hunter, H. E.; Husby, P. O.; Fidel, J.; Mosley, J. C. (Society for Range Management, 2018-12)
    Native plant abundances within the grasslands and sagebrush steppe of the Northern Range decreased substantially during the 20th century and the degradation has continued during the 21st century. Forage production has declined precipitously, and ecological processes (i.e., water cycle, energy flow, and nutrient cycle) are impaired and degrading further. The declining health of Northern Range grasslands and sagebrush steppe is primarily caused by heavy grazing and browsing by bison and elk, not climatic changes. Excessive grazing and browsing is caused by modern-day management decisions that allowed bison and elk populations to become much larger than primeval times. National Park Service policy requires human intervention (i.e., active management) when human actions have impaired natural ecological processes or altered natural abundances of native plants and animals.
  • History and Status of Wild Ungulate Populations on the Northern Yellowstone Range

    Mosley, J. C.; Mundinger, J. G. (Society for Range Management, 2018-12)
    Native bison and elk co-dominate the assemblage of wild ungulates on the Northern Range, one of the largest and most diverse assemblages of wild ungulates in the western hemisphere. The elk population on the Northern Range in 2018 is 30% larger than the natural, primeval population. The Northern Range bison population in 2018 is 10 times (1,000%) larger than the natural, primeval population. It is unlikely that bison and elk populations inside Yellowstone National Park will be reduced by increased predation by wolves, grizzly bears, or mountain lions because the populations of these carnivores are unlikely to increase - they are controlled currently by intraspecific competition for territory. National Park Service policy requires human intervention (i.e., active management) when unnaturally high numbers of native animals and their negative impacts are caused by humans. The unnaturally high numbers of bison and elk on the Northern Range today resulted from modern-day management decisions based on a misguided paradigm that did not acknowledge the ecological importance of hunting by Native Americans. We suggest that National Park Service personnel work collaboratively with federal, tribal, state, and private partners to develop an adaptive management strategy to purposely restore Northern Range bison and elk populations to their natural, primeval sizes.
  • An Ecological Assessment of the Northern Yellowstone Range: Synthesis and Call to Action

    Mosley, J. C.; Fidel, J.; Hunter, H. E.; Husby, P. O.; Kay, C. E.; Mundinger, J. G.; Yonk, R. M. (Society for Range Management, 2018-12)
  • Human Influences on the Northern Yellowstone Range

    Yonk, R. M.; Mosley, J. C.; Husby, P. O. (Society for Range Management, 2018-12)
    For thousands of years before Yellowstone National Park was created in 1872, hunting and burning by Native Americans were fundamental components of the natural ecological processes on the Northern Range. Impacts by Euro-American fur trappers, miners, ranchers, natural resource managers, tourists, and others have shaped the land and wildlife of the Northern Range for the past two centuries. More controlled burning is needed today to purposely mimic the low-intensity fires set by Native Americans in the prehistoric and historical past. Greater control of bison and elk populations is needed today to sustain the natural abundances of native plants and animals and sustain the natural functioning of ecosystem processes. More controlled burning and greater control of bison and elk numbers are actions consistent with National Park Service policy and consistent with current management of other U.S. national parks.
  • The Condition and Trend of Aspen, Willows, and Associated Species on the Northern Yellowstone Range

    Kay, C. E. (Society for Range Management, 2018-12)
    Aspen, willows, cottonwoods and other deciduous shrubs and trees play a pivotal role in the natural ecosystem function of the Northern Range, and they provide critical habitat for numerous species of native plants and animals. Deciduous shrubs and trees were much more abundant on the Northern Range in primeval times than they are today, especially on the portion of the Northern Range inside Yellowstone National Park. The primary cause of the declines in deciduous shrubs and trees is repeated heavy browsing by elk and bison–not normal plant succession or climatic changes - and heavy browsing is continuing to further degrade most Northern Range aspen, willow, and cottonwood plant communities inside Yellowstone National Park. Excessive browsing is occurring because modern-day management has allowed bison and elk populations to become unnaturally large. Current policy directs the National Park Service to intervene with active management where primeval and present conditions differ because of human actions.
  • An Ecological Assessment of the Northern Yellowstone Range: Introduction to the Special Issue

    Mosley, J. C.; Fidel, J.; Hunter, H. E.; Husby, P. O.; Kay, C. E.; Mundinger, J. G.; Yonk, R. M. (Society for Range Management, 2018-12)
  • Browsing the Literature

    Germino, M. (Society for Range Management, 2018-12)
  • Highlights

    Sheley, R. (Society for Range Management, 2018-12)