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dc.contributor.authorSilva, Marcelina Jasmine
dc.contributor.authorCoffee, Zhanette
dc.contributor.authorYu, Chong Ho
dc.contributor.authorMartel, Marc O
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-13T23:47:51Z
dc.date.available2021-10-13T23:47:51Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-17
dc.identifier.citationJasmine Silva, M., Coffee, Z., Ho Alex Yu, C., & Martel, M. O. (2021). Anxiety and Fear Avoidance Beliefs and Behavior May Be Significant Risk Factors for Chronic Opioid Analgesic Therapy Reliance for Patients with Chronic Pain - Results from a Preliminary Study. Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.), 22(9), 2106–2116.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid33595642
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/pm/pnab069
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/662077
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To describe differences between patients with chronic, non-cancer pain (CNCP) who were successfully able to cease full mu agonist chronic opioid analgesic therapy (COAT), and those who exhibited refractory COAT reliance, among those who participated in a multidisciplinary program designed for COAT cessation. DESIGN: A retrospective review of electronic medical records (EMR) data was organized for preliminary analysis. SETTING: A multicenter private practice specializing in CNCP, which received patient referrals from the surrounding geographical area of primary and specialty care offices in Northern California. SUBJECTS: Data from 109 patients with CNCP who participated in a multidisciplinary program to cease COAT between the dates of October 2017 to December 2019 were examined. METHODS: EMR data, pre-COAT cessation, of oral morphine milligram equivalence (MME) and validated questionnaire responses assessing anxiety and fear-based beliefs and behavior, as well as opioid misuse, were extracted and compared between those who successfully ceased COAT and those who did not. RESULTS: Patients who were unsuccessful at COAT cessation reported significantly higher Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FAB) scores. No significant differences were found based on incoming MME amounts, Current Opioid Misuse Measure (COMM) or Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK) scores. Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) scores showed a split pattern with unclear significance. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that fear avoidance beliefs and behavior, as measured by the FAB, play a significant role in refractory COAT reliance for patients with CNCP.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.titleAnxiety and Fear Avoidance Beliefs and Behavior May Be Significant Risk Factors for Chronic Opioid Analgesic Therapy Reliance for Patients with Chronic Pain-Results from a Preliminary Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1526-4637
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Nursing, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalPain medicine (Malden, Mass.)en_US
dc.description.noteOpen access articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.issue9
dc.source.beginpage2106
dc.source.endpage2116
refterms.dateFOA2021-10-13T23:47:52Z
dc.source.countryEngland


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© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).