ABOUT THE COLLECTION

The mission of the Arizona Pest Management Center (APMC) is to support College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) faculty in their efforts to develop and deliver outstanding Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs that address the needs of Arizona’s citizens. This includes IPM programs serving agriculture, urban communities and natural areas.

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For information, please contact APMC at https://acis.cals.arizona.edu/about-us/arizona-pest-management-center.

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Recent Submissions

  • Beginner’s Guide to Predator Thresholds

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Pier, Naomi; Keith, Macey; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2024-03-05)
    Guide covering all instructions and elements needed to learn use of Predator Thresholds for managing whiteflies in cotton.
  • Request for Section 18 emergency use of Endigo® ZCX insecticide to control the palestriped flea beetle (Systena blanda) in guayule fields in the state of Arizona

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Peterson, Jack; University of Arizona, Department of Agriculture; Arizona Department of Agriculture (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-03-22)
    Arizona Section 18 specific exemption request to authorize the use of Endigo® ZCX insecticide (EPA Reg. No. 100-1458) to control palestriped flea beetle in guayule.
  • Arizona Section 18 Request for Endigo ZCX Use in Guayule Addendum

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Pier, Naomi; Peterson, Jack; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology; Arizona Department of Agriculture (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-04-19)
    Support for Arizona’s Section 18 request for use of Endigo ZCX for the control of palestriped flea beetle for protection of guayule, this addendum is to clarify and augment the application submitted in March 2023.
  • Cotton Insecticide Use Guide: Knowing and Balancing Risks

    Bordini, Isadora; Fournier, A.; Naranjo, Steven E.; Pier, Naomi; Ellsworth, Peter C; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology; USDA-ARS (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2024-02-02)
    Many factors must be considered when choosing an insecticide, such as cost, efficacy, risk of resistance, and safety to non-target organisms. This Cotton Insecticide Use Guide summarizes the diverse risks of insecticides used to control three pests, helping you make well informed pest management decisions.
  • Non-target Effects of Insecticides in Cotton

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Bordini, Isadora; Pier, Naomi; Department of Entomology, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-11-15)
    Handout reviewing 2023 cotton season trials, including a discussion on historical trends in insect control, Plinazolin and Sefina usage in Arizona cotton, ThryvOn cotton research, and early season insect control options. Handout was provided during the field tour during the 13th Annual Central Arizona Farmer Field Day held on November 15, 2023.
  • Anatomy of a Cotton Sweep for Pests and Predators

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Brown, Lydia; Pier, Naomi; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-08-09)
    Regular sampling of cotton with a sweep net is one of the most powerful ways to monitor the density of key pests and natural enemies, facilitating critical decision-making. It is subject to individual variation, but standardization of sweeping technique can be accomplished so sweeps results of one pest manager match those of another pest manager.
  • Potential Pest of Arizona Pecans: Rapid Communication (Update)

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Pier, Naomi; Hall, W. Eugene; Moore, Wendy C; Haviland, David; University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, Department of Entomology; University of California Kern County Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-05-26)
    A mirid plant bug was observed in high numbers on the catkins of some central Arizona pecan orchards in the spring of 2021. This was the first time multiple growers reported the plant bug, expressing concerns about potential impacts to the crop. This communication is designed to update stakeholders on the limited knowledge we have about this potential pest. Growers are encouraged to review this information with their pest control advisor to determine actions needed.
  • Cotton Insect Control Trends: Where do we go from here?

    Ellsworth, Peter C; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology and Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-04-20)
    The Arizona cotton IPM strategy has depended on the introduction and stewardship of multiple selective technologies like Bt cottons for lepidopteran control and selective insecticides that are specific to whiteflies or Lygus control. The system is entirely dependent on these technologies and their safety to natural enemies like predators that provide biological control of whiteflies and other pests. Recently, we introduced Predator Thresholds for determining the level of biological control provided by 6 groups of cotton predators. How to manage ThryvOn has become a very common question this year, now that it is completely commercialized and growers have made purchasing decisions outside of planted seed contracts.
  • Tips on How to Manage Lygus Efficiently in ThryvOn Cotton

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Bordini, Isadora; Pier, Naomi; University of Arizona, Entomology Department (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-07-07)
    ThryvOn cotton has been introduced to Arizona largely through seed contracts and other limited programs in 2021. The Arizona cotton IPM strategy depends on the introduction and stewardship of selective technologies like Bt cottons for lepidopteran control and selective insecticides for whitefly or Lygus control. The system also depends on their safety to natural enemies like predators that provide biological control of whiteflies and other pests. Recently, we introduced Predator Thresholds that guide insecticide application timing for whitefly control by determining the level of biological control provided by 6 groups of cotton predators.
  • Manejo fitosanitario de insectos de hábito chupador en algodonero

    Ellsworth, Peter C; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology and Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-03-23)
    The Arizona IPM strategy, in conclusion, was rooted in these innovations. 1) Science-based sampling and threshold plans; 2) A determined and intentional transition away from broad-spectrum insecticides and to selective technologies, including whitefly insect growth regulators and other fully selective insecticides and Carbine and Transform for Lygus control; 3) A strong integration of chemical and biological controls as first envisioned by the progenitors of IPM more than 60 years ago; and 4) The development and deployment of “Use Instructions” for natural enemy conservation and the “Predator Thresholds”.
  • Control Integral Quimico y Biologico en Algodon

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Bordini, Isadora; Pier, Naomi; Naranjo, Steven E.; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology, Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-03)
    El control biológico funciona. Funciona aún mejor cuando los controles químicos se seleccionan cuidadosamente para que se conserven los grupos de benéficos clave. La chinche ojona, escarabajo Collops, arañas cangrejo, larva de crisopa, chinche pirata y la mosca Drapetis son los benéficos claves el sistema del algodón. Pueden mantener bajo control la población de mosca blanca cuando sus números son lo suficientemente altos.
  • The University of Arizona 2022 Cotton Variety Testing Program - Trial Results

    Norton, Randy; University of Arizona, Extension Agronomist (College of Agriculture, Life & Veterinary Sciences & Cooperative Extension, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-02)
    Variety selection is one of the most important decisions a grower will make contributing to the success of a cotton crop. It is critical, that a grower have as much information as possible in order to make an informed decision regarding variety selection. In an effort to help supply reliable variety performance information, the University of Arizona conducts a statewide cotton variety testing program. The 2022 cotton season variety trials were conducted in 3 locations across Arizona including Yuma, Maricopa, and Safford. This testing program is called the University of Arizona Upland Cotton Advanced Strains Testing Program.
  • Highly Hazardous Pesticide Phase-Out for US Cotton Growers: Alternatives, Risks, and Opportunities

    Wynne, Karen; Fournier, Alfred; Ellsworth, Peter C.; Better Cotton Initiative; University of Arizona (2023-01)
    As part of its focus on making cotton production better for the environment and the people who produce it, Better Cotton is committed to reducing the hazardous impacts of pesticide use on human health and the environment. Better Cotton supports farmers to prioritizeIPM practices, phase out Highly Hazardous Pesticides (HHPs), and minimize the negative impacts of pesticides that continue to be used. We reviewed seven of the most acutely toxic substances that have been used by Better Cotton growers in the US to understand risks to human health and the environment, chemical and cultural alternatives, mitigation measures, and tradeoffs and limitations. The active ingredients are abamectin, aldicarb, bifenthrin, dicrotophos, lambda-cyhalothrin, oxamyl, and phorate. The information reviewed includes pesticide use reports from California and Arizona, interviews with key regional experts, EPA risk assessment documents, the IPM Institute’s Pesticide Risk Tool, and other online resources. HHPs are defined by the World Health Organization and UN Food and Agriculture Organization; Better Cotton reviews and revises its list annually to reflect updates to product information.
  • Highly Hazardous Pesticide Phase-Out for US Cotton Growers: Alternatives, Risks, and Opportunities

    Ellsworth, Peter C.; Fournier, Alfred; University of Arizona, Department of Entomology, Maricopa Agricultural Center (2022-09-30)
    The global community has identified sets of highly hazardous pesticides, of which at least 16 are in use by US cotton growers, four of those are prohibited and others are targeted by Better Cotton for phase-out. While there have been attempts to unify this information into a single list, agencies and organizations have maintained their own versions of highly hazardous pesticides. This report examines current use patterns, utility and efficacy; alternative pest management technologies and techniques including their efficacy, limitations and trade-offs; specific environmental and human health hazards, and translation to risks in the US cotton system, and efficacy and limitations of mitigations. We also present barriers to phase-out for each insecticide and the ramifications this might have for Better Cotton’s US cotton production. Lastly, we identify opportunities for supporting growers during this period of transition, including with coordinated education and outreach.
  • Guayule Weed Management During Establishment in Arizona – September 2021

    McCloskey, William B.; Evancho, Blase; Pier, Naomi; University of Arizona School of Plant Sciences; University of Arizona Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-12)
    Guayule is a desert-adapted crop that is grown using agronomic practices like those used to grow cotton. Guayule seed is planted shallow in dry soil on beds and then irrigated to germinate the seed. Guayule seedlings are small and grow slowly making them poor competitors with weeds. Weeds must be actively managed for several months after planting until the crop canopy closes and guayule becomes very competitive against weeds.
  • Palestriped Flea Beetle Control During Guayule Stand Establishment: Use the Right Special Local Needs Label!

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Pier, Naomi; University of Arizona Department of Entomology & Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2022-10-04)
    Special Local Needs labels are issued by the State, subject to review by EPA. The Arizona Department of Agriculture has approved a new label for Bifenture® EC for use against palestriped flea beetles in guayule. This new label replaces three prior labels that were available only for a short time in the Spring of 2022.
  • Making Whitefly & Predator Counts

    Vandervoet, Timothy F.; Ellsworth, Peter C.; Brown, Lydia; Fournier, Alfred; Naranjo, Steven E.; New Zealand Plant and Food Research; University of Arizona; USDA-ARS (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2019-01 r)
    Guidelines for sampling whiteflies and identifying predators critical in their management. Includes predator-prey tables that provide guidelines that aid in management decisions of whiteflies.
  • Whitefly Predator “Thresholds” in Cotton

    Ellsworth, Peter C.; Pier, Naomi; Fournier, Alfred; Naranjo, Steven E.; Vandervoet, Timothy F.; University of Arizona; USDA-ARS; New Zealand Plant and Food Research (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2019-01 r)
    Natural enemy conservation is central to pest avoidance in cotton. The benefit of predators for controlling whiteflies should not be overlooked. Today’s growers can use selective technologies that conserve predators, which play a critical (& free) role in controlling whiteflies. We don’t normally think of predators as having “thresholds”, but new research identifies critical levels of predators that impact economic spray decisions for whiteflies.
  • In 7 Minutes or Less!

    Ellsworth, Peter C; Brown, Lydia; Castro, Gilberto; Naranjo, Steven E.
    In 7 minutes or less and just 7 steps, you can determine the size and structure of Bemisia tabaci populations in a cotton field. With this information, more precise and appropriate control decisions can be made.
  • Cotton Insecticide Use Guide: Knowing and Balancing Risks

    Bordini, Isadora; Fournier, A.; NARANJO, STEVEN E.; Pier, Naomi; Ellsworth, Peter C; University of Arizona; USDA-ARS (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2020-07-11)
    Many factors must be considered when choosing an insecticide, such as cost, efficacy, risk of resistance, and safety to non-target organisms. This Cotton Insecticide Use Guide summarizes the diverse risks of insecticides used to control three pests, helping you make well informed pest management decisions

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