ABOUT THE COLLECTION

The UA Honors Theses Collection provides open access to Honors College theses produced at the University of Arizona, submitted electronically since 2008. Not all students opt to include their theses in the repository, so the collection is not comprehensive.

Honors College theses from the late 1960s to 2005 are not online and are available only in Special Collections. These theses are not listed in the online catalog, but a separate card catalog for them is available in Special Collections.

Individuals trying to obtain a record or copy of their own Honors College theses, such as electronic submissions since 2008 that are not included online, or paper Honors College submissions from 2006-2007, should contact the Honors College..

Important note for students submitting Honors Theses: your thesis must be submitted directly to the Honors College (not to the repository). The Honors College delivers approved theses to repository staff at regular intervals. Check with your Honors College advisors and see Honors Thesis/Capstone for more information.

QUESTIONS?

Please refer to the Dissertations and Theses in the UA Libraries guide for more details about UA Theses and Dissertations, and to find materials that are not available online. Email repository@u.library.arizona.edu with your questions about UA Theses and Dissertations.

Recent Submissions

  • BEST PRACTICES IN PROVIDING HEALTH CARE TO DEAF POPULATIONS

    Goldsmith, Melissa; WALSH, CHRISTINE MARIE (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    Culturally competent health care for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing is significantly understudied within the United States. Limited knowledge is taught within healthcare programsfor nurses, doctors, pharmacists, and other professionalson how to bridge this existing communication barrier. Withinthe Deaf community, this has led to a couple reoccurring issues. First, lack of access to culturally competent care may make Deaf individuals may be more inclined to avoid regular appointments with a primary care provider (PCP). Delaying regular assessments, health education, and screenings can result in underlying and untreated health conditions worsening over time. Second, Deaf individuals may frequent the emergency department more often for minor issues due to both a lack of health education and education on appropriate healthcare resources. The articles examined address existing barriers to health care and current interventions focused on mitigating disparities for this population. This paper will address recommendations for the nursing profession on how to strengthen trust, improve training, and enhance communication with the Deaf population. In addition to the review of current literature, this paper will identify best-practice recommendations, a plan proposal for implementing resources and training among hospitals, and finally, a proposal to evaluate the implementation process.
  • Language Usage of Stress-Induced Individuals

    Killgore, William D. “Scott”; Ventola, Gabrielle Shaughnessy (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    Social stress manifest as both physiological effects (such as sweating or increasing one’s heart rate), and psychological effects (like anxiety and depression) (Newman 2003, Thayer et al., 2011). One manifestation of stress that curiously provides an insight into both the physiological and psychological impacts upon an individual is the way that one chooses words to use. The primary objectives of the Stress Study are to determine the relationship between personality factors and emotional state characteristics under stress. This study proposes that language usage and emotional state determinants are identifying factors that predict performance under stress. We hypothesize that those participants who use less emotionally driven language should have decreased cortisol levels to baseline. Conversely, those who use more emotionally driven language should have increased cortisol levels to baseline, thereby showing that language usage can identify factors of stress resilience or vulnerability in given individuals. The data collected did not prove statistically significant, however, three underlying trends arose. 1. We observed an increase in cortisol levels at initial collecting of saliva and after the modified Trier Social Stress Test, but not during the post-stress reminder time period, which creates an interesting notion that the participants were more stressed when initially entering the testing site and once the speech was concluded. 2. The simple scatterplots conveyed that specific LIWC word choice may be used as a way of a coping mechanism to decrease stress level 3. The results of the ANCOVA’s and simple linear regression models suggested that with a more in-depth statistical analysis word choice can be indicative of one’s resiliency to stress. Collectively, these findings indicate that word choice and language usage could be an identifying factor to determine if someone is resilient or not resilient to stress. These results have the potential to be used in future studies that can perform a higher level of statistical analysis and compare a variety of factors that are not just limited to word choice
  • BEST PRACTICES IN INTEGRATIVE MODALITIES FOR BREAST CANCER PATIENTS AND SURVIORS

    Goldsmith, Melissa; VALDIVIA, ANGELA (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    Background: Breast cancer is a major disease process that impacts millions of women per year. The current treatment options are extremely invasive, contribute adverse side effects that are difficult to manage, and place a financial burden on the patient population. Research on integrative health is evolving daily and vast amount of research provides hope for more evidence-based integrative care of women with breast cancer in the future. Evidence-based integrative intervention implementation encompasses the principles of integrative nursing and best nursing practice.Aim: This thesis aims to develop evidence-based best practice recommendations for usingintegrative modalities to reduce symptoms related to cancer treatment and improve the health-related quality-of-life for individuals diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods: PubMed database was searched for published studies. The literature review assessedthe effects of yoga and mindfulness-based interventions on quality-of-life for women with breast cancer. Conclusion: The literature search identified 6 articles. Yoga is a specific integrative modality that can be recommended as an evidence-based intervention to alleviate symptoms and provide supportive care for the breast cancer patient population. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy are safe and potentially beneficial integrative interventions to improve quality-of-life; however, further research via well-designed controlled studies along with significant outcomes are needed before mindfulness can be distinguished as evidence-based.
  • HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS EARLY GENES AS A MECHANISM FOR INNATE IMMUNESYSTEM EVASION THROUGH THE CGAS-STING PATHWAY

    Campos, Samuel K.; Spence, Erica (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    Human Papillomavirus is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the UnitedStates and in the top three worldwide, infecting up to 80% of the population, and causing around5% of cancers including almost all cases of cervical cancer. Research in this field may seeminconsequential since there is a vaccination in place; however, in most of the world, this vaccineis unobtainable or unaffordable while HPV still infects a vast majority of the population, makingresearch in the field important to treatment and understanding of the virus.Previous work has found that HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes interfere with p53 and pRbfunction. E6 and E7 inhibition of p53 and pRb lead to uncontrolled cell growth which underliesHPV’s oncogenicity. The cGAS-STING pathway is an innate immune pathway that sensescytosolic DNA causing the phosphorylation and activation of STING and IRF3 to initiateantiviral interferon (IFN) responses. Our preliminary data suggest that HPV18-immortalizedkeratinocytes, which express physiological levels of HPV oncogenes, have a defectivecGAS-STING response.I hypothesize that E6 and/or E7 alone may inhibit cGAS-STING antiviral responses, inaddition to known roles in antagonizing p53 and pRb. To test this hypothesis, I attempted togenerate a panel of HaCaT keratinocytes that stably expressed PV oncogenes either alone or incombination. I also attempted retroviral vector transduction of HaCaTs to generate clonesexpressing E6 and/or E7. If my hypothesis is correct, there would be lower levels of pIRF3 andpSTING in some E6 and/or E7-expressing cells compared to controls. Understandingmechanisms of specific oncogene inhibition of cGAS-STING innate immune responses wouldadvance our understanding of how high-risk HPV may evade the innate immune system toestablish persistent infections, the risk factor for HPV-associated cancers.
  • BEHAVIORAL GENETICS: THE POTENTIAL FOR EARLY DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF READING DISABILITY

    SIWIK, JEREMY ANTHONY (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    This thesis examines reading disability, behavioral genetics, and the potential for methods in genetics to identify pupils for early reading intervention. A literature review was conducted to convey first the current understanding of reading disability andits aspects. This review was conducted through searching online databases and using published journal articles and literature. Then a summary of the evolution of the field of behavioral genetics, and the methods and the discoveries that have been found. Through an understanding of both, a relationship between the two was established, and methods used in behavioral genetics are suggested as ways of screening for reading disability so that early interventions may be applied for the greatest positive effect.
  • SIRIUS BY UNITED: MOTION GRAPHIC MARKETING COLLATERAL AND IN-FLIGHT ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM

    Leslie, Kelly; PHAN, JOHNNY (The University of Arizona., 2020)
  • BEST NURSING PRACTICES IN TREATING PEDIATRIC PAIN WITH SENSORY THERAPIES

    Goldsmith, Melissa; PATTERSON, KIERSTEN LYNN (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    This Honors Thesis reviews the current research about the best nursing practices to alleviate pain through adjunct sensory therapies among the pediatric population. Children are at a disproportionally high rate for underdiagnosed and undertreated pain related to their ability to express, quantify, and or describe pain to healthcare professionals. This can be due to the pediatric populations wide range of cognitive abilities coupled with healthcare staff's lack of knowledge on assessment tools. Evidence-based articles within the past ten years were found using the databases ClinicalKey, Embase, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar. All articles focused on pediatric pain, interventions, and ways to decrease the unpleasant sensory experience. Other articles discuss the barriers to assessing pediatric pain, the use of age-appropriate tools, and ways to combat these issues. A majority of the interventions work based on the Gate Control Theory of pain that will be discussed in Chapter one. Interventions suggested in the paper adopt an Integrative Nursing Principle approach to care. This means that interventions should begin with the least invasive therapies. Sensory therapies are minimally invasive and rarely carry the burden of side effects. However, these therapies should be used as an adjunct with the use of prescribed analgesics to support the alleviation of pediatric pain and improve quality of care. Based on the review of current literature, this paper will highlight the best nursing practice recommendations for nurses, a plan for implementation, and an evaluation of the process.
  • RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS (RSV) AND ASTHMA—POTENTIAL FOR INTERVENTION

    Boitano, Scott; OROSCO, MARISSA LEIGH (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a common virus that has the potential to infect people of all ages and is prevalent in countries all over the world. Most cases of RSV infections are presented in the upper respiratory tract, but there are cases of lower respiratory tract infection, which tend tolead tomore harmful consequences. In some instances, RSV infections can be responsible for the emergence of other short-term respiratory issues, such as pneumonia and bronchiolitis. This can occur if an RSV infection worsens and leads toconditions that make thelungs susceptible to illnesses and even chronic diseases. Asthma is common chronic health condition affecting millions of people worldwide, and increasing evidence shows that having severe RSV infections at an early age is linked to adult asthma. This literature review focuses on research findings that provide supportive evidence for how RSV islinked to asthma and possible interventions for both RSV and asthma. Iwill look at the backgrounds, the pathophysiology, and treatments and preventative options of both RSV and asthma. Then, I will focus on the main findings among the correlations between the cytokines that are upregulated during severe RSV infections, such as interleukin-33(IL-33), IL-13, and IL-5,and how those same cytokines areinvolved with asthma genesis and recurring asthmatic inflammation. Finally, I will discuss the potential forpreventing asthma development caused by RSV via early RSV vaccination.
  • SLICING THE SERPENT: FOUR FAMILIES AND THEIR STRUGGLES WITH CHRONIC PAIN AND OPIOID ADDICTION

    Muñoz, Manuel; RUSH-MILLER, MARGARET (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    Maggie Rush-Miller, “Slicing the Serpent: Four Families and Their Struggles With Chronic Painand Opioid Addiction” Honors Thesis University of Arizona, Aug 2020This excerpt, from a book length project, follows the lives of four families, beginning in the late1990s, as the fathers/husbands slowly become addicted to the opioids Oxychotin and Oxycodoneprescribed by their doctors for chronic pain. These stories coincide with the over-prescribing ofopioids on a national level initiated by the pharmaceutical company Purdue Pharma. As othercompanies follow suit, a national epidemic ensues manifesting in over half a million deaths dueto the overdose of pain-killers and heroin. This excerpt is told in the first person through theexperiences of myself and the three other mothers/wives as we attempted to contain the slowdecline of our spouses and their physical and mental health--loss of careers, marriages, and inone case, life, is the final outcome as these insidious drugs take over. Interviews of the eightchildren, friends, physicians, and addiction counselors are also utilized. Combined withadditional research, areas such as: pain, suicide, self-harm, addiction, healing, the medicalcommunity, politics, and the history of opium are covered within this body of work.
  • BEST PRACTICES IN HOLISTIC SEXUAL HEALTH PROMOTION

    Parisek, Betty; MCFEE, JENNIFER ANNE (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    This thesis will explore research related to the holistic promotion of sexual health at individual and community levels. Best-practice recommendations will be synthesized, implemented into nursing practice, and evaluated to optimally address the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of women. The extant literature overwhelmingly identifies the need for increasingly comprehensive sexual health promotion beyond the traditional biomedical approach of pregnancy planning andsexually transmittedinfection avoidance. Additionally, it is indicated that education related to sexual health and wellness should be reinforced across the lifespan. This paper proposes a series of best-practice clinical recommendations to foster optimalsexual health and wellness at multiple ecological levels.
  • ENVIRONMENTAL LEADER OR CULT LEADER?: A CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS OF FRENCH AND US REPRESENTATION OF GRETA THUNBERG AND CLIMATE CHANGE DISCOURSE

    Provencher, Denis; MCCLELLAN, BRENNA VICTORIA (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    In the contemporary world, the media have expanded the space where culture, politics and science interact, which creates distinct discourses. These discourses have the ability to impact cultural beliefs and political reform. This thesis aims to investigate the representation of climate change discourse in French and US elite newspapers and employs a critical discourse methodology inspired by the work of Norman Fairclough and others. Articles from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Le Figaro, and Le Monde are used in both the qualitative and quantitative analysis of this thesis. This study claims that US climate change discourse is heavily influenced by neoliberal ideals established by the 104th US congress whereas French climate change discourse echoes political and cultural ideals of the French Republic and secularism. This critical discourse analysis is conducted in order to add to the literature of understanding how discourse is shaped by the social elements of culture and politics. Dans le monde actuel, les médias élargissent l'endroit où la culture, la politique et la science interagissent afin de créer des discours distincts. Ces discours ont la capacité d’influencer les croyances culturelles et les réformes politiques. Cette thèseexamine la représentation du discours de changement climatique dans les journaux élites en France et aux Etats-Unis et utilise une méthodologie de l’analyse du discours critique qui est inspirée par le travail de Norman Fairclough et d’autres. Des articles de The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Le Figaro, et Le Monde sont utilisés dans l'analyse qualitative et quantitative de cette thèse. Cette étude conclut que le discours de changement climatique américain estinfluencé fortement par les perspectives de néolibéralisme qui ont été établies par le 104e Congrès américain tandis que les conclusions françaises indiquent que le discours de changement climatique français reflète les croyances culturelles et politiquesde la République Française et la laïcité. Cette analyse du discours critique est achevée pour enrichir la littérature scientifique afin de comprendre comment le discours est façonné par les éléments sociaux de la culture et de la politique.
  • THE INFLUENCE OF LITERACY CAMPAIGNS: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF CUBA AND NICARAGUA

    Pietz ,David; LIZARRAGA, AMELIA JEANETTE (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    This thesis will consider the historical impacts, methodology, and effects of literacy campaigns in both Post-Revolution Cuba and Nicaragua. Literacy will be examined through the lens of its necessity in educational human rights, and these campaigns will be applied to modern issues in sustainable development. Political implications of radical social form in the context of literacy will be examined to understand the purpose behind education following revolution. Most critically, this work will bring to lightthe great deal of influence the Cuban National Literacy campaign had on Nicaragua’s literacy crusade. In general, this thesis supports the idea that Cuba’s literacy campaign was overall more successful in its literacy achievements even presently because of their continued educational influence in other parts of their world and the minimal foreign influence they have experienced.
  • REBIRTH OF LEIFENG PAGODA – HANGZHOU, CHINA

    Welter, Albert; LISAK, ROBERT MATTHEW (The University of Arizona., 2020)
  • CASE MANAGEMENT, MOBILE HEALTH CARE AND PERMANENT HOUSING: INCORPORATING PRE AND POST HOSPITAL CARE TO PREVENT FREQUENT EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT VISITS

    Gerald, Joe; KING, DANIELLE BROOKE (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    The use of emergency departments(ED) has increased over the years as more individuals have begun to use the ED services in place of primary care offices and urgent cares. With an increase in ED utilization, there is a higher cost to the hospital as well as an increased chance of overcrowding. This can also have a negative effect on patient care.Individuals who utilize an ED four or more times in a year are considered frequent users.To combat the amount of frequent ED users, programs have been implemented within hospitals across the United States; specifically, case management, mobile health careand permanent housing programs. Information was collected through a literature search utilizing relevant databases and keywords to find and analyze papers on case management, mobile health care and permanent housing programs and their effectiveness at preventing frequent ED use and the costs associated with it. Overall, there was a positive correlation with the programs and decreasing the amount of times an individual frequented the ED.
  • STEREOTYPE THREAT’S EFFECT ON NON-ATHLETE STUDENTS’ INTELLECTUAL ABILITIES

    Stone, Jeff; KIEFER, LOGAN BAILEY (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    Stereotype threat has become widely known to negatively impact humans’ abilities to perform. This phenomenon and its counterpart, stereotype lift, are both examined in this study regarding their effects on non-athlete students. Positive stereotypes elicit intelligence threat which, in turn, has led targeted groups to perceive negative stereotypes being expressed as well. Black undergraduates are typicallystereotyped as being more athletic, regardless of their athletic ability, than white undergraduates. This can lead to them being misidentified as being a student-athlete on a college campus. To directly determine stereotype effects, this study will examine the effects of misidentifying non-athlete students as student-athletes and measured by having participants complete a verbal anagrams task. Effects will also be examined through questionnaires relating to mind wandering, perceived belonging at one’s academic institution, and stereotype distancing. Black, White, and Asian undergraduates will participate in order to examine cross-racial effects. Black participants are expected to demonstrate stereotype threat, White participants are expected to experience stereotype lift, and Asian participants are expected to have a null effect as athleticism is not an inherent stereotype for their ethnicity.
  • AGE-RELATED CHANGES IN GLIAL CELL PROPERTIES AND THEIR IMPACT ON EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX STRUCTURES IN THE RETROSPLENIAL CORTEX OF COGNITVELY-ASSESSED MACAQUE MONKEYS

    Barnes, Carol; KHATTAB, SALMA OMAR (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    Impaired cognitive function is known to occur with normal brain aging and one of the most commonly reported age-related changes is a decline in memory function (Harada et al., 2013). We sought to study perineuronal nets (PNNs), an extracellular matrix structure that forms at the end of the critical period of brain development and is known to reduce brain plasticity (Sorg et al., 2016). Relatively little is known about how the properties of these structures change across the lifespan, or how potential alterations in them may impact the manifestation of age-related cognitive decline. Additionally, studies have reported that the aging brain shows increased microglial activity and pro-inflammatory status which ultimately result in the release of neurotoxic factors (Clarke et al., 2018; Conde & Streit, 2006). The implications of these microglial network changes on brain plasticity and cognition are also unclear. To address these questions, we used brain tissue from cognitively-assessed adult and aged monkeys to search for changes in PNN structure and potential correlates with age-related performance disparities on three memory-assessing tasks. We then used adjacent tissue samples from those same animals to search for any potential correlates that may exist between brain plasticity, as assessed through PNNs, and the state of microglia and astrocyte networks. We found that aged animals had fewer perineural nets in the retrosplenial cortex compared to younger animals. This decrease in perineuronal nets also correlated specifically with a lower performance on the delayed nonmatching-to-sample task. Furthermore, we found these protocols could be used to label and quantify microglia in the same region, which will allow us to continue to work towards answering our second question regarding if/how microglial changes map onto changes in the structure of perineuronal net and their potential correlates with memory decline.
  • ALLOSTERIC REGULATION OF GSK-3 BY SMALL MOLECULES IN HUMAN COLONIC EPITHELIAL CELLS IN THE STUDY OF COLON CANCER

    Thorne, Curtis; Inman, Jenna Lorell (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    GSK-3 is a prominent protein in colon cancer that regulates how colon cells proliferate and differentiatefrom the stem cell stage. Its unique structure containing seven pockets for potential binding makes GSK-3 a promising target for drugs that could prevent cell proliferation in colon cancercells. This study examined the effects various small molecules can have on regulating GSK-3 when the molecules are used to treat colon cancer cells. Since GSK-3 effects whether or not the protein β-cateninis degraded, the activity of GSK-3 was indirectly measuredby examining changes in the β-cateninprotein levels. As β-cateninlevels were seen to increase or decrease, hypotheses could be made regarding if and how each small molecule was affecting GSK-3 andwhat the implications could mean for colon cancer. While many of the results are inconclusive and require further testing, some compounds of interest stood out as having potential activating or deactivating effects on GSK-3. Future experiments consisting ofvarious types of assays and testing of additional cell lines will likely reveal more about each of these compounds’ effecton GSK-3.
  • EPISTEMIC CIRCULARITY, THE CRITERION, AND RATIONAL ENTITLEMENT

    Cohen, Stewart; GUTIERREZ, DAVID ROBERT (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    In this paper I examine the threat of epistemic circularity to our being justified in claim to reliability knowledge of our basic belief sources. I begin with Alston’s presentation of epistemic circularity and its relation to the ancient problem of the diallelus. I relate the diallelus with that of the criterion. By means of track-record argument, I consider William Alston’s treatment of the problem to orient its threat to our forming justified belief, such that majority of this paper serves to get a clear picture on what it takes to consider ourselves justified in our assumptions of reliability by means of perceptual justification. I then consider common-sense approaches to skepticism from that of G.E. Moore and Thomas Reid so as to provide reasons to accept dogmatism. It is on the basis of Crispin Wright’s conception of rational entitlement I provide reasons to accept hinge propositions to reliability claims. I focus on securing rational entitlement to these hinge-propositions so as to avoid circularity and skepticism. I put forth a reply with common-sense leanings that is largely indebted to a contextualist interpretation of Wittgenstein.
  • AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE GREEN RIVER FORMATION AND EOCENE HYDROSPHERE

    Tierney, Jess; GRAVES, KATHERINE VIRGINIA (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    The Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation in southwest Wyoming is composed largely of lacustrine deposits dating back to the Eocene Climatic Optimum around 50 million years ago. The deposits show evidence of recurring lake high stands that are paced by orbital cycles. One of the ongoing research questions in this area is how orbital-scale changes in rainfall source and intensity contributed to this cyclical deposition. One hypothesis is that rainfall was delivered from the Pacific Ocean, paced by orbital forcing. Another hypothesis is that rainfall arrived from the Gulf of Mexico, via a “proto-monsoon” system. Terrestrial plants in the region continuously record a chemical signal of precipitation, which is well preserved in these lacustrine deposits. Using samples of a rock core obtained by the USGS, we were able to extract the organic compounds present in the formation. Gas chromatography and stable isotope mass spectrometry allowed us to further analyze deuterium and hydrogen ratios in plant-derived fatty acids in concurrent layers of rock. Present-day rainfall deriving from the Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico basins have very different D/H compositions, so we were able to compare obtained data with these modern-day values for a proxy estimate ofthe origins ofEocene precipitationover the proto American West. Completed analysis of half of the original samples suggests evidence of orbital forcing at work in shifts of D/Hin lithified organic sedimentsand thus shifts in precipitation origins. Further testing is needed to conclusively link observed trends topatterns of repetition we expect to see in the data based on known sedimentation rates in the Green River basin.
  • Contamination and Redemption Sequences in Narratives of Environmental Suffering

    Sullivan, Daniel; Granger, Liza (The University of Arizona., 2020)
    Redemption and contamination sequences are narrative patterns that derive meaning from events. Environmental trauma narratives involving pollution exhibit such qualities in a literal and figurative sense. This study focuses on how and how often these types of sequences appear in accounts of environmental trauma from an expert group perspective and the perspective of community members who have experienced the pollution. For this study transcript data from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Oral History Project were used. 18 transcripts were used consisting of nine from the expert group and nine from the community member group. Further research is needed to establish the relationship between identity and frequency of sequences in the rhetoric of each group.

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